Skip to main content

I Want (or Don't Want) MacBook Air

Updated: certainly some of the reported problems (obscure USB among others) might make this device not as appealing. I also priced out a similar Sony Vaio - and they ended up being equally priced but you got more with the Vaio. Hmph...my foray back into Mac land may have to wait a bit...

OK - now I know what I definitely want for my new notebook. The overall HW specs don't sound that great - but it's time to dump my Dell (I reviewed the buy-out on my HW lease - what a rip-off - this machine is going back) - and I really do think it's time to come back to my true 6-color roots (even if Apple's colors these days run more platinum)

But seriously...it's THAT thin???? Cripes...and it looks like their pricing for Canada is close to on par. $1899 Cdn vs. $1799 US. If you look at today's exchange rate ($1.0378), it's pretty close.

Yes , I suppose I could look at a Sony VAIO - but no thanks, Sony. I've pretty much stopped doing business with you (even if you did go DRM-Free at Amazon).

Could I use it as my development workstation? Hard to say, but I remember almost 8 years ago, seeing Ed Leafe doing all his dev on his MacBook and I was envious. Definitely time.

But VFP Developers, what are you using for your development machines?
Apple Canada - MacBook Air

Comments

Alan Stevens said…
I've been using VFP on my Macbook for a year now.

++Alan
Juan Calcagno said…
Andrew,

From the software developer perspective, I don't see the point on getting a laptop for $1799 where its hard drive is 80gb and the maximum screen resolution rendered is 1280x800. These 2 points are deal breakers for me. Unless this is your second laptop, but still...
For around $2200 I can get a Dell M 1530 with a 300gb HD and a 1650x1050 max screen resolution, plus 3 years of on site total care (accidental or not).
Are actually looking at other features that I am missing?
WF said…
I'm a desktop guy... but I'm pretty much satisfied working on a Gateway laptop.

That... and those bulky IBM models.

Apple products are good... but it's 50% technolust.

We can't deny the skills of their engineers and designers though. Steve Jobs included... : ]
wOOdy said…
That MacBook Air is just for Womanizers ;) Yes it has a huge WAF (Woman Accepance Factor), but it's not usable for real work. Come on: 13" with 1280x800? I'm already running out of space on my 15" 1680x1050!
And a superslow 80Gb 1,8" 4400rpm PATA harddisk? I barely find enuf place on my 200Gb 7200rpm SATA 2,5" harddisk.
Then there's only 1 USB port, and not even a microphone jack (for Skype or VOIP). No smartcard-, no PCExpress-, no PCCard slots. All you have is one lonely USB-Port for all your gadgets you'll need to connect. Thus you'll find yourself equipped with a lot of carry-ons additionally to that thin thingy....
Nope. No way that I would use that overpriced thing for work.
I'm happy with a fully equipped DELL D830. Not that lightweight, but: hey, we are mans, we can stand that weight! ;)
Andrew MacNeill said…
Agreed, Woody. After hearing about a number of the problems with the Air, it's making me rethink my decision (good thing I didn't order it).

It's a great looking machine - but definitely needs more power.

And the price is still a little high.

Popular posts from this blog

FoxInCloud Stats

FoxInCloud sent this link a while back about their statistics regarding visits to their site:

http://foxincloud.com/blog/2017/12/27/VFP-community-lessons-from-foxincloud-site.html



What's interesting here is the breakdown of people. Yes, I think it's understandable that the Fox community is getting older.

Another factor is the growth of the mobile and web environments taking over development. These environments really do push people towards the newer non-SQL or free SQL/hosted environments but more towards hosted storage options like Amazon and Google. A tool like FoxInCloud that helps MOVE existing applications to the cloud inherently competes with those environments.

But FoxInCloud also allows developers to extend their application further by giving them a starting point using Javascript and the basic CSS (such as Bootstrap). If you're not rebuilding your application from scratch, it's certainly a great step forward.

Well, that explains CodePlex...

In a move that will be sure to anger open source (or rather anti-paid software, anti-Microsoft open source)  zealots, Microsoft is planning to buy GitHub.

A year ago, I mused about why Microsoft would shut down CodePlex and how the world needs competing source code repositories to be strong. I'm not the only one per this Slashdot article :
"...people have warned about GitHub becoming as large as it did as problematic because it concentrates too much of the power to make or break the open source world in a single entity, moreso because there were valid questions about GitHubs financial viability...." - Jacques Mattheij

I will be interested in seeing this play out - whether developers jump ship or not. Have all the efforts Microsoft has made in pushing towards open source be seen as genuine or will all the zealots jump ship or maybe even attack?

Microsoft's comment about why they shut down CodePlex referred to how spammers were using CodePlex. Well, GitHub has its own …

The World of Updates Today

I just received an update for Office 365. It certainly includes some cool features - including starting in one environment and picking it up in another environment. In recent years, I've certainly enjoined the use of Continuity on a Mac and in fact, I feel spoiled being able to start a message in one environment (even Google) and then finish it off on another.  This has become some pervasive when we were reviewing our most recent backlog at a client site, a similar feature was added to the current workload.

But with web applications, the trend is to reduce the amount of software on a client machine. I used to have automatic backup for all of my machines (thanks Carbonite!) but these days, many of my machines don't need anything beyond the core OS and some basic applications. Certainly that's the feeling with Chromebooks and even the lightweight aspect of many iOS apps. The functionality is mostly in the cloud.

When you upgrade your system, you expect it to a big update. So…